skyeye
Halley Dust and Milky Way

The early morning hours of May 6 were moonless when grains of cosmic dust streaked through dark skies.
Swept up as planet Earth plows through dusty debris streams left behind periodic Comet Halley, the annual
meteor shower is known as the Eta Aquarids. This inspired exposure captures a meteor streak moving left
to right through the frame. Its trail points back across the arc of the Milky Way to the shower's radiant
above the local horizon in the constellation Aquarius. Known for speed Eta Aquarid meteors move fast,
entering the atmosphere at about 66 kilometers per second. Still waters of the small pond near Albion, Maine,
USA reflect the starry scene and the orange glow of nearby artificial lights scattered by a low cloud bank.
Of course, northern hemisphere skygazers are expecting a new meteor shower on May 24, the Camelopardalids,
caused by dust from periodic comet 209P/LINEAR.